Immigration Removal Orders Rise, But With Wide Variation By Court
(19 Dec 2014) The U.S. Immigration Court is granting a greater proportion of the deportation orders that are being requested by the government. According to the latest case-by-case records, current through the end of November 2014, the Immigration Court granted 54.8 percent of such orders issued during the first two months of FY 2015 (October and November 2014) compared with only 50.7 percent during FY 2014.

The rate at which deportation orders were granted varied considerably among the individual courts. The Immigration Court based in North Carolina issued deportation orders in 84.9 percent of its cases while in Texas the rate was 70.8 percent. The Florida Immigration Court granted deportation orders 49.9 percent of the time; in Arizona the rate was 42.8 percent, in California it was 38.7 percent and in Oregon it was 25.5 percent. For full details, see
While backlog and wait times continue to rise, the court has shortened by 38 days the time taken between when DHS files until removal is ordered. During both FY 2013 and FY 2014 it took on average 280 days, whereas during the first two months of FY 2015 the average time until removal is ordered has dropped to 242 days. For details, see:
TRAC's free web query tools -- which track new DHS filings, the growing court backlog, the handling of juvenile cases and much more -- have also been updated through November 2014. For an index to the full list of TRAC's immigration tools go to:
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