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Associated Press
September 28, 2014

Attorneys sought for immigration case overload
By Amy Taxin


Most of the nearly 60,000 Central American children who have arrived on the U.S.-Mexico border in the last year still donít have lawyers to represent them in immigration court, and advocates are scrambling to train volunteer attorneys to help cope with the massive caseload. With the number of unaccompanied immigrant children more than doubling this past fiscal year, the need for attorneys has surged, and it has been exacerbated by the immigration courtsí decision to fast-track childrenís cases, holding initial hearings within a few weeks instead of months. Immigrants can have counsel in immigration courts, but lawyers are not guaranteed or provided at government expense. Having an attorney can make a big difference: While almost half of children with attorneys were allowed to remain in the country, only 10 percent of those without representation were allowed to stay, according to an analysis of cases through June by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University.


Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, Syracuse University
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